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Patty Jo Anzivine
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Patty Jo Anzivine
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Tips for Getting a Better Night's Sleep

January 15, 2014 5:15 am

Adults need on average 6 to 9 hours of sleep a night. If you wake up already feeling tired, then you probably aren't getting enough sleep. In 2007, motivated by her own struggle with insomnia, Cool-jams founder and CEO Anita Mahaffey launched her signature line to help everyone sleep easier. Seven years later, Cool-jams has a few suggestions for getting a good night's sleep based on their continued research combating insomnia.

"A good night's sleep is controlled by temperature," Mahaffey explained. "Research shows that decreasing core body temperature is essential for falling and remaining asleep."

While the ideal temperature varies from person to person, experts suggest keeping bedroom temperatures no higher than 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Other ways to help regulate body temperature is taking a bath 90 to 120 minutes before bedtime, sleeping with a hot water bottle at the foot of the bed, and sleeping in comfortable, moisture-wicking sleepwear and temperature regulating bed sheets.

"Light governs sleep patterns," Mahaffey said. "Your body's wiring tells you to get up when there is light and to sleep when it is dark."

When it is dark, the body produces melatonin, a hormone that initiates sleep. This hormone not only promotes good sleep, it also impacts long-term health. When sleep is disrupted by light, it leads to lower melatonin levels, which can increase cancer risks. To reduce insomnia, avoid TV before bed, sleep in a pitch-dark room, install blackout drapes, cover up the clock radio's light, and avoid night-lights.

"What you eat plays a role in how you sleep," Mahaffey said. "Certain foods keep you awake while others promote a better night's sleep."

When consumed late in the evening, grains and sugars make it harder to sleep because they cause blood sugar to rise, which inhibits sleep. Yet, eating a high-protein snack near bedtime can aid in melatonin and serotonin production, helping promote a solid snooze. Additionally, it's wise to avoid alcohol.

"Even though alcohol causes drowsiness, it prevents you from falling into the deeper stages of sleep," Mahaffey explained.

Source: Cool-jams

Published with permission from RISMedia.