RE/MAX 440
Patty Jo Anzivine
pattyjovine@gmail.com
Patty Jo Anzivine
4550 W. Tilghman Street
Allentown  PA 18104
PH: 610-390-0415
O: 610-398-8111
F: 267-354-6902 
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Get Your Home Ready for Outdoor Entertaining

June 28, 2013 10:28 pm

(Family Features)--With the warm weather here, it's time to get your house and yard in shape for outdoor entertaining. Here are a few tips to quickly spruce up your home for your next gathering, so you can spend more time with family and friends, and less time worrying about the prep work and clean up.

Tidy Up the Yard
- The first thing guests will notice is the condition of your lawn, so make sure to give it a fresh mow the day before you're having guests over. Tidy up yard debris like extra sticks and mulch, and put away garden tools, lawn toys and garbage cans so they are out of view.

Add Fresh Flowers - Find annuals in your favorite party-theme colors and plant them in ceramic or terra cotta pots to brighten the space. Position potted plants as table centerpieces, near serving stations, and on the patio or deck for pops of color. Use your home as a way to express your personal style and get creative by coordinating flowers with your table linens and furniture upholstery.

Clean Up Your Sitting Area - From picnics and pool parties, to birthdays and cookouts, get your backyard ready for the season. It is a good idea to spruce up your deck at least once a year to remove any weathering and stains that may have occurred, and wipe down lawn and patio furniture that was lying dormant during the winter. Tackle both with a product that is gentle on unfinished wood. Remember to rinse thoroughly any residual product.

De-grime the Grill - Grungy grills are never a welcome part of any backyard barbecue, especially if they were collecting dust and dirt all season. Wipe the grime and grease off the outside of the grill, and clean the interior racks, by scrubbing with a wire brush and a solution of three parts baking soda to one part warm water. Rinse thoroughly.

With the right tips and tricks you can easily prep your home for entertaining and offer your guests a comfortable and relaxed experience during all of summer's festivities.

Source: www.oxiclean.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Summer Home Repair Safety Tips to Prevent Serious Hand and Finger Injuries

June 28, 2013 10:28 pm

Hand and finger injuries are among the most common causes for emergency room visits, but taking time to prepare a safe work area, using proper tools and alerting someone nearby about your home repair project can reduce your risk for serious accidents this summer.

The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) database reports that nearly 3.5 million people a year are seen in a U.S. emergency room for injury to an upper limb, which ranges from shoulder to fingers; of these, 45 percent occur at home and 23 percent involve deep cuts, called lacerations. Dr. Nebil Bill Aydin, a board certified plastic and reconstructive surgeon with the New York Group for Plastic Surgery and an attending surgeon at Westchester Medical Center, has operated on many home repair-related upper limb injuries, including the wrist laceration experienced by 55 year-old David Guiliano of Valhalla, NY, that nearly cost him his left hand.

Guiliano, a firefighter as well as a professional bricklayer, was renovating a friend's pool house and needed to demolish a brick seven feet up a wall. He stood on an overturned plastic bucket and held his heavy electric grinder tool in both hands high over his head. As he pushed grinder to brick, the blade tip caught and jerked, pushing him backward. As he fell, the grinder slipped from his grasp and the blade sliced his left wrist, cutting through tendons, nerves and arteries down to the bone.

Looking back, Guiliano recognizes that his many years as a bricklayer led to complacency about home repair work. "I didn't secure my balance, and I used a grinder with an exposed blade instead of a saw with a protective guard," he said. "I bypassed important precautions because of my experience, but I'd urge everyone to take time to prepare properly and put some simple safety measures in place for any task using tools."

Regardless of experience, following simple safety rules can help you avoid a serious injury:

• Think through the tools and materials you'll need in advance, and position them strategically in your work area before starting. If you realize in the middle of the project that you've forgotten a tool, carefully and fully disengage from your work to get it — do not lean over or reach up for it.

• Do not use a tool that lacks safety mechanisms or is inappropriate for a specific task. If you're unsure, check with an expert at the hardware store.

• Alert a family member or neighbor that you are undertaking a home repair project and ask if they'll come by to check up on you periodically.

• Keep a phone and first aid supplies nearby, in case. If you're not working at your own home, be sure you know the specific address so emergency dispatch can find you, and be aware of nearby major medical centers.

Source: New York Group for Plastic Surgery

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Foreign Home Buyers Continue to Identify U.S. as Profitable Investment

June 28, 2013 10:28 pm

International home sales in the U.S. declined in the past year, but are at their second highest level in recent years and are over six percent of total existing-home sales in value. According to the National Association of REALTORS® 2013 Profile of International Home Buying Activity, interest in U.S. properties continues to grow, signaling that America continues to be regarded by international buyers as a great place to own property.

The survey, which asked REALTORS® to report their international business activity within the U.S. for the 12 months ending March 2013, showed that total international sales were $68.2 billion, down approximately $14 billion from the previous year. The decline is attributed to a number of temporary factors, including economic slowdowns in a number of major foreign economies, tighter U.S. credit standards and unfavorable exchange rates. Of total international transactions, $34.8 billion (51 percent) were attributed to foreign buyers with permanent residences outside the U.S. and $33.4 billion (49 percent) were attributed to buyers who are recent immigrants or temporary visa holders residing for more than six months in the U.S.

“Foreign buyers are experiencing hurdles not only abroad, but also here in the U.S. when it comes to purchasing property,” said NAR President Gary Thomas. Difficult economic conditions, particularly in Europe, have impacted foreign buyers, but several factors in the U.S. have also affected their purchasing power here. Tight credit standards have made financing challenging for immigrants, and low housing inventories have made finding a house difficult. However, none of these factors appear to be permanent.”

Foreign buyers continue to have a substantial interest in U.S. properties. Over a five-year timeframe, more than 70 percent of REALTORS® reported a constant or increasing level in the number of international clients contacting them.

“REALTORS® provide international buyers with a significant advantage when purchasing property in the U.S. REALTORS® who have earned NAR’s Certified International Property Specialist designation have received specialized training and are well prepared to service the international market,” said Thomas.

Twenty-seven percent of REALTORS® reported having worked with international clients this year. The most important factors influencing international clients’ purchases reported by REALTORS ® were that the U.S. is viewed as a desirable location and that the real estate market is regarded as a profitable investment.

REALTORS ® reported purchases from 68 countries, but five have historically accounted for the bulk of purchases; Canada (23 percent), China (12 percent), Mexico (8 percent), India (5 percent) and the United Kingdom (5 percent). These five countries accounted for approximately 53 percent of transactions, with Canada and China the fastest growing sources over the years.

Canadian buyers were reported to purchase properties with a median price of $183,000, with the majority purchased in Florida, Arizona and California. Chinese buyers tended to purchase property in the upper price ranges with a median price of $425,000 and typically in California. Sixty-two percent of Mexican buyers purchased property in California and Texas, with a median price of $156,250.

International buyers tend to cluster in specific locations based on countries of origin, as well as several other factors. “Many factors influence foreign buyers’ decisions on where to purchase in the U.S., but the most important are proximity to home country, presence of relatives and friends, availability of job and education opportunities, and the climate,” said Thomas. “International buyers also differ on the type of desired property. Some are looking for trophy properties while others are interested in modest vacation homes.”

Source: NAR

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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What to Do After a Car Accident

June 28, 2013 10:28 pm

Every year hundreds of thousands of people in the U.S. are involved in traffic accidents. Many of these accidents result in only minor injuries, but massive insurance claims. It is wonderful if you find yourself physically unscathed after an accident. However, you will at some point have to deal with your insurance company as well as the insurance agents of others involved in the accident.

Filing an insurance claim and handling insurance adjusters can be quite a task, and it is important to get legal advice. However, here are some things you may want to do on your own in order to better protect yourself.

Make sure you have an emergency kit in your vehicle. This should include pen and paper, a camera (sometimes your cellphone camera can be damaged in an accident), a medical card listing emergency contacts and any known allergies, a flashlight and, if possible, a set of cones or emergency flares.

Contact your insurance company as soon after the accident or injury as possible. Don’t forget to keep safety first, and move vehicles off to the side and out of the way if possible. Unless you have some very serious injuries to take care of, your insurance agent is the first person to call in case of an accident or injury.

Do your best to get as many details of the accident as possible. This will include taking pictures of the damaged vehicles and any injuries. Make sure to take pictures from different distances as well as from different angles. Also, do try to take down the names and numbers of any witnesses to the accident who may later be able to help your case in the event the other driver disputes your account of events.

Source: www.florida-accident-law.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Bring Your Personal Design Style to Life

June 28, 2013 10:28 pm

(Family Features) You’ve made the decision to remodel your home. The budget range and project scope have been set, but now you aren’t sure how to begin this new adventure. Following a few simple guidelines and tips can simplify the process of turning your vision into a ravishing remodel.

Set the Style Scene

Many homeowners know exactly where their preferences fall on the style spectrum, while others have no idea. As a first step, identify your personal style before moving forward with any steps of the remodel. There are even websites that offer a style quiz to help you determine where your style falls.

Even if you think you know what you want for a space, develop a mood board to help you visualize your design style. A mood board will ensure that others, such as professionals or family members, understand your vision. Gather items on your board such as colors, patterns and images that make you feel good. You (and a designer) can make sense and draw meaning from it later.

There are some great resources online for developing these boards. Pinterest, a tool that enables users to “pin” their favorite items, is extremely useful for finding ideas and forming a vision.

Turn Dreams into Design


Once you are in tune with your style, engage a designer. The remodeling process is overwhelming and designers are a great resource.
“One of the biggest advantages to working with a designer on a home project is that they really understand functionality, while accomplishing your desired style,” says Sarah Reep, director of designer relations and education at KraftMaid Cabinetry. “By telling a designer the details of your lifestyle and gripes about your current layout, they can turn out a well-designed space that will fit all of your needs.”

Working with professionals doesn’t have to break the bank and can actually save you time, money and provide peace of mind in the long run. Avoid costly mistakes and ensure that the professionals you hire are fully certified and qualified for the task.

Great kitchens and baths start with great design. At the end of the day, you’ll be thankful for the time spent during the dreaming and designing phases of your remodel. These steps will help bring your dream to life, just the way you imagined it.

Source: KraftMaid

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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New Study Finds U.S. Diesel Vehicles Have Lower Total Cost of Ownership than Gasoline Vehicles

June 28, 2013 10:28 pm

A new study released found that diesel vehicles saved owners between $2,000 to $6,000 in total ownership costs during a three- to five-year period when compared to similar gasoline vehicles, according to data compiled by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute.

"Overall, the results of our analyses show that diesel vehicles provide owners with a TCO (total cost of ownership) that is less than that of the gas versions of the same vehicles," according to the study. "The estimates of savings for three and five years of ownership vary from a low of $67 in three years to a high of $15,619 in five years, but most of the savings are in the $2,000 to $6,000 range, which also include the extra cost that is usually added to the diesel version of a vehicle."

Fuel efficiency has always been a major attraction of clean diesel vehicles. Because diesels are 20 to 40 percent more fuel efficient than gas cars, drivers save money with diesels even when diesel fuel prices are slightly higher than gas prices.

The findings in this study will also be helpful to car buyers as they research their next vehicle purchase. This is an exciting time for diesel vehicles as the number of diesels is expected to more than double in the next two years. This will give drivers a broad selection of vehicles to fit their individual driving needs.

Highlights from the diesel-gasoline comparisons include:

• Total Cost of Ownership: In the three year timeframe comparison, diesel vehicles in the mass market passenger car segment are estimated to save owners significant money, with the VW Jetta owner saving $3,128, the VW Jetta Sportwagen owner saving $3,389, and the VW Golf owner saving an estimated $5,013. In the luxury segment, all the diesel versions of the Mercedes-Benz E Class ($4,175), Mercedes-Benz GL Class ($13,514), Mercedes-Benz M Class ($3,063), Mercedes-Benz R Class ($5,951) and VW Touareg ($7,819) save owners money in the three year timeframe.

• Fuel Efficiency: All of the diesel vehicles had better miles per gallon than the gasoline versions with the diesels having between 8 to 44 percent higher miles per gallon.

• Fuel Costs: All of the diesel vehicles had lower fuel costs than all the gas versions of comparable vehicles, with 11 of the 12 vehicles showing double digit reductions in fuel costs, ranging from 10 to 29 percent. Similar to the three-year comparisons, five-year estimated fuel costs for diesel vehicles are less than those of comparable gas versions. The percentage difference in terms of the reduction from gas to diesel costs decreased for some diesel-gas comparisons as diesel prices began to increase around the 2005 timeframe.

• Depreciation: Eleven of the 12 diesel vehicles held their value better than comparable gas vehicles over the three-year timeframe with eight vehicles showing double digit percentage savings ranging from 17 percent up to 46 percent.

• Nine of the 10 diesel vehicles hold their value better than comparable gas vehicles over the five-year timeframe, with five vehicles showing double digit percentage savings ranging from 10 percent up to 39 percent.

The report analyzed the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) for clean diesel vehicles and comparing their TCO to their gas vehicle counterparts. The study developed three- and five-year cost estimates of depreciation by modeling used vehicle auction data and fuel costs by modeling government data. The study also combined these estimates with three- and five-year estimates for repairs, fees and taxes, insurance, and maintenance from an outside data source.

Source: Diesel Technology Forum

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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The White House Beats Out A-List Celebrity Pads as the Home Most Americans Want To See

June 28, 2013 10:28 pm

Despite the insatiable fascination with the lives of Hollywood celebrities, if given the opportunity to view only one famous home, one in three Americans (31 percent) would choose to see The White House instead of the luxury home hideaways of known stars such as Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt (14 percent), Jennifer Lopez (10 percent) and Jay-Z and Beyonce (6 percent) -- proving that First Families are always en vogue.

The inaugural "HGTV HomePulse Survey," the first in a series commissioned by Scripps Networks Interactive and Vision Critical to monitor consumer perspectives on home-related topics such as real estate, renovation, decoration and budgeting, also uncovers that Americans' true obsession is with improving or enhancing their own homes.

Home Improvement Spending Trumps Vacation
The survey of approximately 1,000 randomly selected respondents ages 18+ finds that more than 81 percent believe that "money spent on improving my home will show a good return," while 66 percent agree that "now is a good time to invest in my home." In fact, Americans love their homes so much that 61 percent indicate that they would "choose to spend on their homes rather than on something else like a vacation or the latest electronics."

"We expected the 'HGTV HomePulse Survey' to confirm that people love their homes and are willing to spend money to improve them, but we didn't expect that they would be willing to give up something as important as a vacation to do it," said Denise Conroy, senior vice president, marketing, HGTV. "The appetite that Americans have for where they live transcends other popular interests and indicates a much deeper relationship between consumers and their homes."

When it comes to the preferred home improvements, men and women tend to agree on the need to expand the overall square footage of their home. However, 31 percent of women vs. 17 percent of men would opt to update the decor while 19 percent of men vs. three percent of women would choose technological enhancements. Interestingly, while many people want to create a comfortable home on the inside, 1 in 3 respondents tagged "a beautiful outdoor space" as extremely important to them.

Sending Out an SOS
Americans are passionate about home improvement, but in need of advice and information when working with professionals. Only 1 out of 5, about 22 percent, is confident that they are knowledgeable enough to keep a contractor honest.

Pursuing the American Dream
The "HGTV HomePulse Survey" also reveals that 76 percent of all non-homeowners are optimistic that they will eventually own a home, undoubtedly underscoring an improving housing market. Also worth noting is that a whopping 64 percent of non-home owning Millennials believe they will be ready to own their own home in their 30s.

Source: HGTV

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Home Remodeling More Popular Than Ever as New Home Prices Rise

June 28, 2013 10:28 pm

According to the Census Bureau, a 28.9 percent rise in new home sales since last year -- coupled with a lack of premium existing properties on the market -- is causing home renovation spending to hit a six-year high. Power Home Remodeling Group cautions homeowners to spend smartly on remodeling projects by investing in fundamental improvements such as roofing, siding and window replacement that will earn the biggest return on investment in this time of cautious optimism as the housing industry continues to slowly improve from the recession. According to Remodeling Magazine, homeowners who invest in an upgrade to vinyl siding will recoup around 72 percent of the renovation's costs in added value to the home.

"Homeowners are investing money in their homes again as the cost of renovations is less than the cost of buying a new property and selling their existing property. Though it may be tempting for homeowners to make personalized improvements, it is important to spend money wisely when renovating and focus on upgrading basic home functionality to get the biggest bang for their home improvement buck," says Corey Schiller, Power's chief executive officer.

Power offers the following tips for exterior home improvements that update a home's style and curb appeal while also making it more valuable:

• Vinyl Siding – Updating the exterior of your home with vinyl siding will help increase your home's curb appeal while boosting its energy efficiency. Replacing the exterior of your home with vinyl siding will cut down on the maintenance of your home's facade and the project can recoup up to 72 percent in added home value.

• Energy Efficient Windows & Doors – New, energy efficient windows are ideal for insulating a home from extreme temperatures that change with the seasons. If a window overhaul is unrealistic, replacing windows in key rooms of the home where the sun rises and sets can make a huge impact. Old or improperly sealed doors can also significantly affect a home's energy efficiency by allowing air to easily escape. Installing a new door can provide more effective insulation than older ones. Window and door replacement can recoup up to 74 percent in added home value.

• Roofing – Though roofing typically lasts between 20 to 30 years before needing a full replacement, weather can loosen or damage shingles, putting a home at risk for water damage and air leaks. Fixing small issues before they turn into a huge headache can help save you time and money in the future. However, if your roofing needs to be replaced, the project can recoup up to 62 percent in added home value.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Housing-Cost Burdens Rise for Renters

June 25, 2013 12:20 am

The most recent edition of the Center for Housing Policy (CHP)’s annual Housing Landscape report finds that severe housing-cost burdens among working renter households have risen for the third consecutive year. Housing Landscape 2013 explores the latest American Community Survey data from 2011, showing that 26.4 percent of working renters spent more than half of household income on housing costs. While severe housing-cost burdens stayed relatively stable for working homeowners between 2008 and 2011, roughly one in five working homeowners experienced severe housing affordability challenges throughout this period – despite falling home prices and mortgage interest rates.

The Housing Landscape report defines a working household as one with an income less than 120 percent of the median for its area, and with members working at least 20 hours per week on average.

The share of working renter households with a severe housing-cost burden grew over the three-year period due primarily to falling incomes and rising rental housing costs. Nationally, working renters saw their housing costs rise by 6 percent from 2008 to 2011, while their household incomes fell more than 3 percent. Lead report author Janet Viveiros says renters are stretched so thin by growing housing costs that many face impossible choices.

“The growing rate of severe housing-cost burdens among renters is not a new trend, but it is clearly an unsustainable one,” says Viveiros. “While rental costs have steadily risen over the last few years, wages for these working families have not fully recovered from the hit they took between 2008 and 2009. Spending most of your paycheck on rent means cutting back on other necessities, including healthcare and even food.”

Co-author Maya Brennan noted that the causes of rising housing-cost burdens among working renters include a difficult economy and an increased demand for rental housing, partly due to the crisis on the homeownership side of the market.

“While the economy pushed both owners’ and renters’ incomes down, the shift away from homeownership is pushing rents up due to increased demand. What we’re seeing with the rental market is not explainable by population trends alone—it clearly reflects the movement of former homeowners into rentals as well as delays in home purchases by current renters,” Brennan explains. “But this increase in rental demand has not been matched by an increase in supply. This imbalance leads to rising rents in markets across the country.”

Working homeowners may have dodged the upswing in housing costs that hit renters, but they have not avoided the effects of falling incomes. In fact, while housing costs among homeowners fell some 3 percent over the study period, household incomes among these homeowners fell even more than they did for renters, down more than 4 percent over the three-year span. However, NHC President and CEO Chris Estes cautioned that a high and growing proportion of all working households—renters and homeowners combined—cannot afford their housing, and that little is being done to help.

"The challenge we face is that despite the range of successful tools to help offset this crisis, we are still in a long trend of flat—and even slashed—funding for these important programs,” says Estes.

Estes notes that a recent report from the Bipartisan Policy Center’s Housing Commission highlighted the success of federal housing programs like HOME, the housing voucher and the Low Income Housing Tax Credit and encouraged expanded funding for these programs to help respond to the housing affordability crisis.

Key national findings from the Housing Landscape 2013 report include:

  • Nearly one in four working households spends more than half of its income on housing. The share of working households with a severe housing cost burden increased significantly between 2008 and 2011, rising from 21.8 percent to 23.6 percent.
  • Declining incomes have exacerbated housing affordability problems for working renters. The median housing costs of working renters rose nearly six percent between 2008 and 2011 while their median incomes fell more than three percent.
  • Severe housing-cost burden was most prevalent among working households earning less than 30 percent of area median income (AMI). Eight in 10 working households earning less than 30 percent of AMI (but working an average of at least 20 hours per week) were severely burdened in 2011, a much higher share than for other income groups. Increases in housing-cost burdens occurred primarily among working households with incomes at or below 50 percent of AMI, but even some working households earning between 51 and 120 percent of AMI are faced with severe housing-cost burdens.

State and local findings include:

  • Between 2008 and 2011, the share of working households with a severe housing-cost burden increased significantly in 24 states and decreased significantly in only one state: South Dakota.
  • Among the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the following five had the highest share of working households with a severe housing-cost burden in 2011:
    • California 34%
    • Florida 32%
    • New Jersey 32%
    • Hawaii 30%
    •  New York 30%
  • Among the 50 largest metropolitan areas, the following five metropolitan areas had the highest share of working households with a severe housing cost-burden in 2011:
    • Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL  41%
    • Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, CA 39%
    • New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA 35%
    • Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL 35%
    • San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA 34%

A closer look at the data reveals that the share of working households with a severe housing-cost burden increased significantly over the three years studied in 18 of the 50 largest metropolitan areas, yet decreased significantly only in the Washington, D.C. and Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, Calif., area. Of the 18 metro areas with rising cost burdens, nine are located in the South. Overall, the level of severe housing-cost burden among working households displayed a high level of variation at the metropolitan level. Levels ranged from a high of 41 percent in the Miami area to a low of 14 percent in Pittsburgh.

Notes: For purposes of this report, “working households” are defined as those with a household income of no more than 120 percent of the area median income in which the household members worked an average of at least 20 hours per week for the preceding 12 months. “Severe housing cost-burden” is defined as monthly housing costs (including utilities) exceeding 50 percent of household income.


Source: Center for Housing Policy

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Keep Your Backyard Pool Safe

June 25, 2013 12:20 am

As temperatures rise this summer, a day at the pool becomes one of the top things to do. However, more than 237,500 swimming-related and 25,522 diving injuries were treated in 2012 in emergency rooms, doctors' offices and clinics, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.  The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) offer the following safety tips to avoid swimming and diving injuries:

Diving tips:

  • Don't ever dive into shallow water. Before diving, inspect the depth of the water to make sure it is deep enough for diving.  If diving from a high point, make sure the bottom of the body of water is double the distance from which you're diving.  For example, if you plan to dive from eight feet above the water, make sure the bottom of the body of water, or any rocks, boulders or other impediments are at least 16 feet under water. 
  • Never dive into above-ground pools
  • Only one person at a time should stand on a diving board.  Dive only off the end of the board and do not run on the board.  Do not try to dive far out or bounce more than once.  Swim away from the board immediately afterward to make room for the next diver.

Swimming tips:

  • Do not swim alone or allow others to swim alone. 
  • Make sure children are supervised at all times. Backyard pools should have a 5-foot minimum high fence that completely surrounds it.  
  • Don't attempt to swim if tired, cold or overheated. 
  • An inexperienced swimmer should wear a life jacket in the water. 
  • Carefully monitor weather conditions before and while swimming.  Avoid being in the water during storms, fog or high winds. 
  • Develop a plan for reaching medical personnel who can treat swimming-related injuries.  Anyone watching swimmers near the water should learn CPR and be able to rescue them. 
  • Never swim or dive under the influence.

Source: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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